Top causes of car crashes in winter

During winter, vehicle malfunctions, roadway obstacles and bad visibility may play a major role in car collisions in Tennessee and Kentucky.

Bad weather can negatively affect the roads in Tennessee, Kentucky and the surrounding area. According to the Weather Company, 1,259,000 collisions that took place over the course of 10 years in the United States were related to bad weather. Winter is a particularly dangerous time on the roads because of the potential for snow, sleet and ice. Drivers across the country may be able to better prepare themselves for winter conditions by understanding the top causes of accidents during this season.

Vehicle malfunction

Vehicles need to be kept in top shape to ensure high-quality performance all year round. However, this is especially important during winter. For example, tires with low tread may struggle to gain traction on icy surfaces. This can make it hard for a vehicle operator to stop or turn while driving. Other potential vehicle malfunctions that could affect a person's ability to avoid accidents during winter include the following:

  • Worn out windshield wipers
  • Dim or blocked headlights
  • Broken defroster fans

Car and truck owners should take the time to inspect their entire vehicles before heading out on the road to ensure everything is in working order.

Roadway obstacle

The snow and ice often associated with winter create obstacles for traffic. Drifts of snow across the roads can leave cars with low clearance stuck. Icy patches may prevent all vehicles, even those with good tires, from stopping before running into the back end of another car. Part of the reason ice creates such a big obstacle is drivers may not realize how much extra time it takes for them to turn, accelerate and stop when the roads are icy. This is especially true when the ice blends in with the pavement, because then drivers may not even realize the roads are slippery until it is too late.

Bad visibility

Finally, winter can create low visibility for those behind the wheel. There are several situations that affect a person's ability to see during winter. Heavy falling snow can make it hard for someone to see the traffic around him- or herself. Even when snow is not currently falling from the sky, wind can cause it to swirl around and reduce visibility.

Calm days could still be linked to a lower ability to see because of the high snow piles that may interfere with a person's sightlines to intersections and pedestrians. Similarly, when the cold outside temperatures meet with the warmer surface of a vehicle, it may cause a fog on the windshield the driver is unable to see out of.

Winter conditions could leave Tennessee and Kentucky drivers at a higher risk for getting into auto accidents. No matter the situation, it may be beneficial to work with an attorney familiar with cases of personal injuries caused by car crashes.